High vs. Low Impact-Factor Journals: What Difference Does It Make to Your Writing Style?

Academic Life

The impact factor, often abbreviated IF, is a measure reflecting the average number of citations to recent articles published in science and social science journals. It is was first devised by Eugene Garfield, the founder of the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI), and is now frequently used as a proxy for the relative importance of a journal within its field, with journals with higher impact factors deemed to be more important than those with lower ones (Source: Wikipedia).

Publication in journals with a high impact factor is regarded as an indication of the quality of the research published and, by implication, the quality of its authors. Not  surprisingly, publishing in highly ranked journals is an aspiration for most scientists and often plays an important role in one’s own career prospects and progression. Yet, as more and more researchers aspire to publish in top rated journals, the competition gets tougher and the success rate…

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